Lake Superior & Ishpeming 2-8-0 No. 33
 
Specifications
Builder: Baldwin Locomotive Works - Philadelphia, PA
Built: February 1916                             
Serial No: #43108
Wheel Arrangement: 2-8-0 Consolidation
Driver Diameter: 50"
Cylinder Bore x Stroke: 26" x 30"
Boiler Pressure: 200 psi
Pulling Power: 60,484 lbs. tractive effort
Engine Weight: 140 tons
Fuel: Coal
Class: SC-1
Status: Undergoing firebox work
 
Age of Steam’s locomotive No.33 is a monstrous 2-8-0 of ample proportions that was constructed during 1916 by Baldwin Locomotive Works (serial #43108) as Munising, Marquette & Southeastern No.44 for service on heavy iron ore trains in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. These ore trains were operated from the Marquette Iron Range to docks on Lake Superior in the town of Marquette for shipment by lake boats to lower Great Lakes steel mills. The 1924 combining of three, separate railroads to form the 173-mile Lake Superior & Ishpeming saw this same 2-8-0 No.44 relettered and renumbered as LS&I No.33.
 
Developing a whopping 72,309 pounds of tractive effort with its rare, tender booster cut-in, this engine and tender had more low-speed lugging power than many larger locomotives.
 
The LS&I operated steam until mid-1962 when dieselization was completed with a roster of all Alco engines. After retirement, No.33 was purchased in 1968 by Jerry Ballard for use on Ohio’s Hocking Valley Scenic Railway. Rebuilt to operating condition by a flock of volunteers (who removed the tender booster and its complicated piping), No.33 successfully chugged along the tourist railroad until this 2-8-0 was laid-up needing heavy repairs.
 
The HVS resorted to diesel operations, and in 2003 No.33 was traded to Jerry Joe Jacobson. The Consolidation immediately entered Morgan Run Shop for repairs, and its nine-month restoration was completed in July 2004. No.33 was under steam until 2008 when Jerry sold his Ohio Central Railroad System to the Genesee & Wyoming.
 
During the time when the Age of Steam Roundhouse facilities were being constructed, there was no opportunity to repair or operate any of Jerry’s steamers, so No.33 has not been fired-up for several years.